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Stanford Global Health Neurology Program

Stanford Neurology’s sustainable global health program focuses on clinical education and research in collaboration with Stanford’s Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH).  

Residency

Stanford Neurology residency offers opportunities to pursue global health experiences in the developing world. We strongly believe in the mutual impact global health exposure can have on our residents as well as on our colleagues overseas.  This field is exploding and you can be a part of it!

As a global health scholar, you will receive interdisciplinary faculty guidance, formal global health education through the Stanford Intensive Global Health Course, and funding opportunities through both internal and international seed grants, including the R25 training grant offered in R3 year. Projects should emphasize capacity building with outcome measurement; examples include neurology education and health systems strengthening.

Ready to get started?  

  • Watch videos derived from Essentials in Global Health by Richard Skolnik. A general foundation in understanding determinants of health care is needed to formulate sustainable projects
  • Attend multidisciplinary seminars on campus
  • Join the AAN: Neurology Global Health Section.
  • Apply for the Stanford Intensive Global Health Course: Beyond Disease and International Organization. Offered 1-2 times per year.
  • Develop a project or join an existing project. Mentorship provided by global health neurologists and Dean Michelle Barry’s team at CIGH.
  • Apply for funding
  • Gain approval from GME for away rotation 90 days in advance.

Innovations

Our current partnership is with Parirenyatwa Hospital at University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences with generous support from CIGH.  Residents who have traveled there have already made strides in working with local trainees and faculty to develop the country’s first sustainable Stroke Center.  Learn more about their experiences.

Consider an elective in Zimbabwe in your R3 or R4 year to continue working on this, and other, important global  neurology projects.

Contact

Nirali Vora, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences

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